Ableton is one of the most well-known music production platforms in the world. The Digital Audio Workstation (DAW) makes music easy to sketch out and is well-tailored for live performance.

As with learning anything, becoming proficient takes time. If you’re a new producer who needs to learn the basics of music and a DAW at the same time, the task can prove even harder. One way to make sure you stick to music making is experiencing the momentum of improvement. Ableton’s new online learning platform helps you do this well if you’re just starting out. If you’re currently feeling stuck, jump into their platform and realize that there is hope!

A few months ago, Ableton launched its online music learning platform for learning music. The first course teaches you music basics and how to start making music. (The course is also available in German, Italian, Spanish, French, and Japanese).

Ableton is clever. They teach you, to their advantage, within the Ableton workflow. What you see in the course is exactly how these concepts play out in Ableton. And, Ableton goes even further by incorporating the paradigm from their amazing Push hardware product. I finally gave the course a try and definitely recommend it for anyone who is new to both music production and musical concepts. Here’s why you should go through the course.

A marketing email from Abelton.

You Learn a Ton in Two Hours

All you need is an internet connection to get started. That’s it. Just visit the learning music website. The whole course takes about two hours.

How to mix and match musical ideas

Song Structure (chorus, hook, verse, breakdown, etc)

The basic elements of a beat, bass line, chords, and melody

You’ll learn what instruments make up a proper beat, how to experiment with bass line patterns, the basics of chord progressions, and why some melodies are catchier than others.

Learn by example

Ableton selects well-known songs, explains why they’re unique and significant, and outlines what a similar sound looks like in Ableton.

 

A “learn by example” page in the Ableton course

The latter is probably one of the coolest and most helpful parts of this program. We all have those moments when we hear a track at a show or party and think, “What’s that sound?” “How did they make that?” “I wonder how to create a similar bass line.” It’s extremely helpful to see how you can lay down similar instruments and sounds in Ableton. I also found the patterns much easier to commit to memory when I associated it with a familiar tune. The program also allows you to play around with the pattern to familiarize yourself with Ableton’s workflow.

An Amazing Overview for a Short Course

Ableton’s new course is comprehensive and easy to follow. Although it’s probably easiest to transfer what you learn into Ableton, the concepts themselves are music fundamentals you can carry over to your DAW or analog instrument of choice. I’ll certainly refer back to this course over and over again. Bookmarked!

Have you tried Ableton’s music learning platform or another eLearning course for music basics? Share your suggestions or thoughts for other new music producers in the comments below.